■マルクス・アウレリウス(Marcus Aurelius)の言葉

■テキスト

 

Marcus Aurelius, Meditations, trans. Maxwell Staniforth (Harmondsworth, Penguin Books: 1964)を使用。日本語訳はこの英訳からの拙訳。 厳密なものでなく一読してわかりよいことをめざした。マルクス・ アウレーリウス『自省録』神谷美恵子訳(岩波文庫)がある。

 

■言葉

 

プラトン主義者のアレクザンダーは緊急の必要があるとき以外は、会話でも手紙でも「自分はたいへん忙しいので」という言葉をやたらと使ってはならないとわたしに注意してくれた。

 

(Alexander the Platonist cautioned me against frequent use of the words "I am too busy" in speech or correspondence, except in cases of real necessity; saying that no one ought to shirk the obligations due to society on the excuse of urgent affairs. 1,38)


だれも彼によって自分が劣っていると感じさせられたことはなく、まただれも彼の偉大さを疑うものはいなかった。彼はまた気持ちのいいユーモアの持ち主であった。

 

(Nobody was ever made by him to feel inferior, yet none could nave presumed to challenge his pre-eminence. He was also the possessor of an agreeable sense of humour. 1,39)

 


修辞学、詩作、などの研究における私の才能に限界を設けたのは神々であった。もしそれらの方面において簡単に進歩ができるとわかれば、私はそれらに没頭したことだろう。

 

(It was the gods who set a limit to my proficiency in rhetoric, poetry, and other studies that might well have absorbed my time, had I found it less difficult to make progress. 1,43)

 


また私は自分の兄弟(隣人)に対して腹を立てたり、けんかしたりすることはできない。なぜなら彼と私は一緒に働くために生まれたのであるから。我々は、いわば人間の両方の手であり、足であり、まぶたであり、上と下の歯であるのだ。

 

(Neither can I be angry with my brother or fall foul of him; for he and I were born to work together, like a man"s two hands, feet, or eyelids, or like the upper and lower rows of his teeth. 2,45)

 


たとえば、かまどにいれた一個のパンが、焼くときには思ってもみなかったひび割れをそこかしこにするとき、そのひび割れはわれわれの食欲を刺激してくれる。またたとえば、いちじくが一番熟したときに裂けて割れる・・・そのような光景はそれら自体では美しくはないが、自然全体の働きによって、自然を魅力的にまた美しく見せてくれるのだ。

 

(When a loaf of bread, for instance, is in the oven, cracks appear in it here and there; and these flaws, though not intended in the baking, have a rightness of their own, and sharpen the appetite. Figs, again, at their ripest will also crack open. . . . many more such sights, are far from beautiful if looked at by themselves; yet as the consequences of some other process of Nature, they make their own contribution to its charm and attractiveness. 3,54-55)

 


周囲の人のことをあれこれ想像することで、あなたの残りの人生を無駄にしてはならない。だれそれはいま何をしているのだろう、なぜそれをしているのか、何を言っているのか、考えているのか、陰謀をめぐらしているのかーーつまり、あなたの心の中にいる支配者への忠誠からあなたの心をそらせるものはどんなものでも、あなたから他の仕事をする機会を奪うのである。

 

(Do not waste what remains of your life in speculating about your neighbours, unless with a view to some mutual benefit. To wonder what so-and-so is doing and why, or what he is saying, or thinking, or scheming--in a word, anything that distracts you from fidelity to the Ruler within you--means a loss of opportunity for some other task. 3,55)

 


「こんな不運が自分に起きるとは私はなんと不幸なのか」と言ってはならない。むしろ、「そんな事件が起きたにもかかわらず、自分の心は乱されず、現在の状況によって揺さぶられず、未来の心配によって痛めつけられることがないとは、自分はなんと幸運であろうか」、と言いなさい。そのことはだれにでも起こりえたのです。しかし、だれもが人格をゆがめずにいるというわけではありません。

 

("How unlucky I am, that this should have happened to me!" By no means; say rather, "How lucky I am, that it has left me with no bitterness; unshaken by the present, and undismayed by the future." The thing could have happened to anyone, but not everyone would have emerged unembittered. 4,75)

 


自分の仕事を愛する職人は仕事に全力をそそぐあまり、風呂も食事も忘れることがある。しかし、あなたが自分の仕事を軽んじるのは、石工が石うちを、踊手がおどりを、守銭奴が銀貨の山を、うぬぼれやが自分の見せ場を軽んじる以上である。これらの人間は、自分の関心がそのなかにあるときには、目標をめざして、寝食を忘れることもあるのだ。

 

(Craftsmen who love their trade will spend themselves to the utmost in labouring at it, even going unwashed and unfed; but you hold your nature in less regard than the engraver does his engraving, the dancer his dancing, the miser his heap of silver, or the vainglorious man his moment of glory. These men, when their heart is in it, are ready to sacrifice food and sleep to the advancement of their chosen pursuit. 5,77)

 


世の中には人に親切にするとその感謝を求めないではおかない人がいる。またそれほどではなくとも、心のなかでおまえはおれに恩義があるぞと、自分のしたことを忘れることのできない人がいる。しかし、自分のした親切をまったく意識しない人もなかにはいるのだ。その人は、ぶどうの房をならせるぶどうの木のようである。果実を実らせると、なんの感謝も人から求めない。また、レースを走る馬のようである。また、獲物の足跡を追いかける猟犬のようである。また、蜜をためる蜂のようである。それらの生き物のように、自分の善行を声高に宣伝せず、次の善行へと移って行く人は、次の夏のぶどうを実らせる仕事にとりかかるぶどうの木のようである。

 

(There is a type of person who, if he renders you a service, has no hesitation in claiming the credit for it. Another, though not prepared to go so far as that will nevertheless secretly regard you as in his debt and be fully conscious of what he has done. But here is also the man who, one might almost say, has no consciousness at all of what he has done, like the vine which produces a cluster of grapes and then having yielded its rightful fruit, looks for no more thanks than a horse that had run his race, a hound that has tracked his quarry, or a bee that has hived her honey. Like them, the man who has done one good action does not cry it aloud, but passes straight on to a second, as the vine passes on to the bearing of another summer's grapes. 5,79)

 


アテネ人はこのように祈る、「愛するゼウスよ、アテネの畑と野原に雨を、雨をください」。祈りというものは、まったく捧げられないか、あるいはこのように、単純素朴であるべきだ。

 

(The Athenians pray, "Rain, rain, dear Zues, upon the fields and plains of Athens." Prayers should either not be offered at all, or else be as simple and ingenuous as this. 5,80)

 


失敗するごとに攻撃に転じよ。

 

(Return to the attack after each failure. . . .5,81)

 


あなたのなかの最も高いものに敬意を払いなさい。それは神とつながっています。

 

([R]everece the highest in yourself: it is of one piece with the Other. . . 5,86)

 


競技場で敵が、私たちにつめでひっかき傷を与えたり、私たちと衝突してうち傷を与えたりすると、私たちはその人物を悪意の持ち主とはみなさない。しかし、その後、彼には気をつける。それは、疑いや憎しみからではなく、ふたたび不慮の事故にあわないように距離をとるのである。人生のほかの場面においてもそのようにしなさい。いわば私たちの競技仲間である人びとの多くの事柄を大目にみよう。すでに述べたように、疑いや悪意をもたないで、ただその人を避けるという方法があるのだから。

 

(When an opponent in the gymnasium gashes us with his nails or bruises our head in a collision, we do not protest or take offence, and we do not suspect him ever afterwards of malicious intent. However, we do regard him with a wary eye; not in enmity or suspicion, yet good -temperedly keeping our distance. So let it be, too, at other times in life; let us agree to overlook a great many things in those who are, as it were, our fellow-contestants. A simple avoidance, as I have said, is always open to us, without either suspicion or ill will. 6,95)

 


すべての事柄において、神々に助けを求めなさい、あまりお祈りの長さにこだわることはありません、三時間で十分です。

 

(In all things call upon the gods for help--yet without too many scruples about the length of your prayers; three hours so spent will suffice. 6,96)

 


「幸せ」(eudaimonia--ギリシャ語)の語源的意味は、「心のなかのよき神」。

 

(Happiness[eudaimonia], by derivation, means "a good god within" 7,108)

 


生きるための技術はダンスよりもレスリングに似ている。後者は、予期しない攻撃に対して、確かな、用心深い姿勢を要求するからである。

 

(The art of living is more like wrestling than dancing, in as much as it, too, demands a firm and watchful stance against any unexpected onset. 7,115)

 


いちどきに自分の人生全体を思い浮かべて自分を混乱させてはならない。つまり、君に起こるかもしれないさまざまの不運なできごと全部に思いをめぐらすのではなく、 不運な出来事に一つ出合うたびにこう自問するのである、「この中にはどんな耐えられないもの、支えきれないものがあるだろうか」と。そうすると自分の敗北を認めるのは恥ずべきことだとわかるだろう。また、君にのしかかっているのは未来の重荷でもなく、過去の重荷でもなくて、今の重荷だけであることがわかるだろう。この重荷でさえ、もし君がその正味の大きさを見とどけ、そのような重荷は自分には耐えることができないという弱音に対して厳しい態度をとるならば、その重荷もまた小さいものになるのではないか。

 

(Never confuse yourself by visions of an entire lifetime at once. That is, do not let your thoughts range over the whole multitude and variety of the misfortunes that may befall you, but rather, as you encounter each one, ask yourself, "What is there unendurable, so insupportable, in this?" You will find that you are ashamed to admit defeat. Again, remember that it is not the weight of the future or the past that is pressing upon you, but ever that of the present alone. Even this burden, too, can be lessened if you confine it strictly to its own limits, and are severe enough with your mind's inability to bear such a trifle. 8,129)

 


死を軽蔑してはならない、むしろそれがやってくるのに微笑みかけなさい。死もまた自然が願うことがらの一つなのです。青春と老い、成長と成熟、歯や髭や白髪があらわれることーー人生の季節がもたらすそのほかのすべてのことがらと同じように、われわれの消滅もあるのです。したがって理性ある人間は、死に対して、軽んじたり、短気になったり、軽蔑してはなりません。彼は、それを自然のもう一つの移り変わりとして待つのです。

 

(Despise not death; smile, rather, at its coming; it is among the things that Nature wills. Like youth and age, like growth and maturity, like the advent of teeth, beard, and grey hairs, like begetting, pregnancy, and childbirth, like every other natural process that life"s seasons bring us, so is our dissolution. Never, then, will a thinking man view death lightly, impatiently, or scornfully; he will wait for it as but one more of Nature"s processes. 9,138)

 


だれかの無礼な態度に腹が立ったとき、すぐにこう自問しなさい、「この世はあんな失礼な奴なしでは成り立たないとでもいうのか」。成り立ちません、だから、不可能なことを求めてはなりません。その人物は、その存在がこの世に必要な、無礼な人間たちの一人なのです。

 

(When you are outraged by somebody"s impudence, ask yourself at once,, "Can the world exist without impudent people?" It cannot; so do not ask for impossibilities. That man is simply one of the impudent whose existence is necessary to the world. 9,148)

 


もうあなたの人生は残り少ない。では、自分が山の頂上にいるように生活しなさい。 世の人びとに真実な人間を見、知る機会を与えてやりなさい。

 

(Now your remaining years are few. Live them, then, as though on a mountain-top. . . . Give men the chance to see and know a true man. . . . 10,157)

 


あなたが死を迎えようとするときこのことを考えなさい、去り行くことを容易にするかもしれません。「自分がその人のために働き・祈り・頭を痛めたその当の仲間すらも私が亡くなるのを願っている、私の死によって安堵を得ようとしている、そうであるのなら、だれがなぜこの世での命をさらに延ばすことに執着するだろうか。」しかし、そのためにやさしさを忘れて世を去るべきではありません。あなたのいつもの友情・好意・博愛をもちつづけなさい。旅立ちを苦しい別離と思わず、あなたの別れを魂が肉体からそっと抜け出す痛みのない死のようになさい。

(Think of this when you come to die; it will ease your passing to reflect, "I am leaving a world in which the very companions I have so toiled for, prayed for and thought for, themselves wish me gone, and hope to win some relief thereby; then how can any man cling to a lengthening of his days therein?" Yet do not on that account leave with any diminished kindness for them; maintain your own accustomed friendliness, goodwill, and charity; and do not feel the departure to be a wrench, but let your leave-taking be like those painless deaths in which the soul glides easily forth from the body. 10,163)

 


あなたがぷりぷり怒ってやっていることがらは、それがあなたのところにやって来るのではなくて、むしろあなたがそれらのもとへでかけているのかもしれません。

 

(It may be that the things you fret and fume to pursue or avoid do not come to you, but rather you go to them. 11,170)

 


成功の望みのないときにも、練習を怠ってはなりません。たいていは練習不足で力のない左手が手綱をしっかりとつかむことができるのは、手綱を操ることにかけては練習を積んだからできるのです。

 

(Practise, even when success looks hopeless. The left hand, inept in other respects for lack of practice, can grasp the reins more firmly than the right, because here it has had practice. 12,181)

 


 

 

 


(C)Muranushi, All Rights Reserved.