Angus Wilson (1913-91)

Angus Wilson Web Sites


Chronology

1913
Angus Wilson born at Bexhill, Sussex, the youngest of six brothers.
1920-1924
Lives in Durban, South Africa, with his mother's relatives.
1924-1927
Attends a preparatory school in Seaford, Sussex, run by his second-eldest brother.
1927-1932
Attends Westminster School as a day boy, while living with his parents in various London hotels.
1929
Death of Wilson's mother.
1932-1935
Reads medieval history at Merton College, Oxford.
1936
Obtains post at the British Museum, London (now the British Library).
1938
Death of Wilson's father.
1941-1944
Works for Foreign Office Intelligence at their establishment at Bletchley Park, Buckinghamshire.
1946-1955
At British Museum (from 1949 as Deputy Superintendent of the Reading Room).
1949
The Wrong Set published.
1950
Such Darling Dodos.
1952
Emile Zola, February. Hemlock and After, July.
1953
For Whom the Cloche Tolls.
1955
Resigns from the British Museum. Keeps a flat in Dolphin Square, Pimlico, but also acquires a cottage at Felsham Woodside, Bradfield St. George, Suffolk, where he has continued to live. The Mulberry Bush first performed by the Bristol Old Vic Company, 27 September.
1956
The Mulberry Bush published, February; also performed at the Royal Court Theatre, London, 2 April. Anglo-Saxon Attitudes, May. Book Society Fiction choice.
1957
A Bit off the Map. The Mulberry Bush televised. Attends (with Stephen Spender) P.E.N. Conference in japan.
1958
The Middle Age of Mrs. Eliot, August. (Awarded the James Tait Black Prize.) Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature.
1960
Ewing Lecturer, University of California, Los Angeles, October. Moody Lecturer, University of Chicago.
1961
Gives Northcliffe Lectures ("Evil in the English Novel"), University of London. The Old Men at the Zoo, September.
1963
The Wild Garden (expansion of the Ewing Lectures). Play, "The Invasion", televised. Joins faculty of the University of East Anglia (part-time).
1964
Tempo: The Impact of Television on the Arts. Late Call, At- tends (with William Golding) Leningrad Writers' Congress.
1966
Appointed Professor of English Literature (part-time), University of East Anglia (retired 1973). Chairman of the Literature Panel, Arts Council of Great Britain. Participates in Adelaide Festival of the Arts, Australia.
1967
Beckeman Professor, University of California, Berkeley. No Laughing Matter.
1968
Appointed C.B.E. Honorary Fellow, Cowell College, University of California, Santa Cruz.
1970
The World of Charles Dickens.
1971-1974
Chairman of the National Book League.
1972
Companion of Literature. Chevalier de l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres.
1973
As If by Magic.
1974
John Hinkley Visiting Professor, Johns Hopkins University. Late Call televised.
1976
The Strange Ride of Rudyard Kipling.
1980
Setting the World on Fire. Awarded a knighthood.

This extract is taken from Averil Gardner, Angus Wilson (Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1985)


Last updated: 13 January 1998.

If you know about any other Web sites related to the life and works of Angus Wilson, please e-mail me at matsuoka@lang.nagoya-u.ac.jp.

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