About CLC
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Faculty

    • Kaoru HORIE
    • Kaoru HORIE
      Professor
    • Profile
      I received a Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of Southern California in 1993. I am currently a professor of Linguistics at Nagoya University. I was formerly at Tohoku University, where I served as the director of the Center of Excellence (COE) program in humanities and promoted interdisciplinary studies on language, cognition, brain and typology. My research interest centers around: (i) a typological and contrastive analysis of complex sentences and grammaticalization phenomena in Asian and European languages, including English, Japanese, Korean, Chinese, Khmer, Marathi, Mongolian, Vietnamese, and (ii) the pragmatics/grammar interface.
    • Field
      Linguistic typology, contrastive linguistics, cognitive linguistics, grammaticalization and language contact, pragmatics/grammar interface
    • Course
      This class situates the Japanese language and its socio-linguistic practices within the context of recent findings in Linguistic Typology, a discipline that inquires into language universals and cross-linguistic variation, and Cognitive-Functional Linguistics.
    • Jeremy Cross
    • Jeremy Cross
      Associate Professor
    • Profile
      I am an Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Languages and Cultures. I have a Bachelor of Teaching (University of South Australia), MA in Linguistics (TESOL) with Distinction (University of Surrey) and PhD in Applied Linguistics (University of Melbourne). I have previously taught at universities in Australia and Singapore.
    • Field
      My primary research interest is L2 listening teaching and learning and I have published related articles in a range of recognized journals including Language Learning, Language Teaching Research, and Language Awareness. Aspects of my research into L2 listening adopt a sociocultural theory perspective.
    • Course
      This course explores L2 pedagogy and learning from the perspective of sociocultural theory. Underlying concepts such as the ZPD, Activity Theory, and dynamic assessment will be covered, as well as empirical research which examines the application of such notions in relation to L2 reading, writing, listening and speaking.
    • Katsuo TAMAOKA
    • Katsuo TAMAOKA
      Professor
    • Profile
      I completed my Ph.D. in the area of lexical access by Japanese children at the University of Saskatchewan, Canada in 1990.
      Since then, I have been a lecturer at Matsuyama University, an associate professor and a full professor at Hiroshima University, a professor at Reitaku University and a professor at Naogya University from 2009 to present. I belong to various societies such as Psychonomic Society, the Linguistic Society of Japan, and Japanese Cognitive Science Society.
    • Field
      I have specialized in psycholinguistics, the interdisciplinary study of psychology and linguistics, to investigate how humans are able to acquire, use, comprehend and produce language. Due to the nature of this discipline, multiple languages, such as Japanese, English, Korean, Chinese, Turkish, Sinhalese, etc., are investigated in the search for universal rules for human language processing. Acquisition of Japanese as a second language by faculty of various language backgrounds are also covered in my studies.
    • Course
      The class‘Japanese Psycholinguistics’mainly focuses on the cognitive processing mechanisms of the Japanese language at the phonetic/phonological, morphological, phrasal, sentential, utterance and textual levels. Research takes multi-disciplinary approaches of statistics, experimental psychology and linguistics. Students obtain an understanding of these multiple, fundamental dimensions to investigate certain topics in language processing or acquisition.
    • Remi MURAO
    • Remi MURAO
      Associate Professor
    • Profile
      I received a PhD in Applied Linguistics from Nagoya University in 2009. My first academic position was as an assistant professor at Waseda University in 2007, where I taught English to undergraduate students for three years. Apart from academics, I enjoy playing the violin in an amateur orchestra.
    • Field
      My primary research area is second language processing. I am particularly interested in phonological processing in spoken word recognition, and the mapping of continuous speech sounds onto the mental lexicon. My PhD work focused on the influence of prosody and formulaicity of language on the recognition of spoken words.
    • Course
      This course provides students with a foundation in second language acquisition research. Topics include theoretical models of SLA, second language processing, and comparison of first and second language acquisition focusing on sociological, psychological, and individual factors. Students are required to read the academic papers scheduled for presentation each week to be able to participate in discussions.
    • Edward HAIG
    • Edward HAIG
      Associate Professor
    • Profile
      I am an Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Language and Culture's Media Professional Studies Department. I have an MSc in Teaching English as a Foreign Language (Aston University, UK) and PhDs in Ecology (University of London, UK) and Linguistics (Lancaster University, UK).
    • Field
      My current research interests include the language of ecology / the ecology of language; the ideological use of language in Japanese and English news media; the interrelations between public and private discourses of youth, crime and class; and the language of radio broadcasting. The two main theoretical and methodological tools that I use in my research are systemic functional linguistics and critical discourse analysis.
    • Course
      This course focuses on three key factors relating to contemporary media: globalization, power and language. The first of these invites us to take a comparative approach to the study of media texts; the second alerts us to the need to think critically about how media and power are related; and the third suggests that any serious study of media texts must pay careful attention to language. Through this course students will acquire a widely applicable set of skills relating to the critical analysis of media texts.
    • Dylan MCGEE
    • Dylan MCGEE
      Associate Professor
    • Profile
      I earned my Ph.D. in Comparative Literature (Japanese/Chinese) from Princeton University (2009), and conducted research for my dissertation at Kanazawa University (2004-2005). ?My principal field of research is Japanese literature of the Edo period (1603-1868), with a focus on the history of book publication, circulation and reception. At present, I am writing a monograph on the history of the Daiso lending library, which operated in Nagoya between 1767 and 1899 and rose to status as the largest commercial lender in Japan. In addition to several translations of early modern Japanese narrative fiction and poetry, I have also published articles on the reception of rental books during the Edo period, the works of Ueda Akinari (1734-1809), the history of amateur chaban kyōgen performance, and the development of clock-based narrative time in the popular genres of kibyōshi and sharebon (1780-1796).
    • Field
      My principal field of research is Japanese literature of the Edo period (1603-1868), with a focus on the history of book publication, circulation and reception. In addition to several translations of early modern Japanese narrative fiction and poetry, I have also published articles on the works of Ueda Akinari (1734-1809), the history of amateur chaban kyōgen performance, and the development of clock-based narrative time in the popular genres of kibyōshi and sharebon (1780-1796).
    • Course
      For the Global 30 course, I will be teaching two year-long graduate seminars—Text and Image in Japanese Narrative and Cultural and Intellectual History of Japan. The first course is a survey of illustrated narrative in Japan, from medieval picture scrolls to modern manga. The second is a survey of Japanese cultural and intellectual history focusing on the early modern and modern periods.
    • Mahito FUKUDA
    • Mahito FUKUDA
      Professor
    • Profile
      BA and M.Eng. from Kyoto Univ. PhD from Tokyo Univ. Visiting Research Fellow at the Welcome Unit for the History of Medicine, Oxford; Visiting Scholar at the Harvard-Yenching Inst. and Visiting Professor at the University of Delhi. Publications: A Cultural History of Tuberculosis, A Treatise on Syphilis in Japan, Dr. Shibasaburo Kitasato, Hospitals and Diseases, etc.
    • Field
      Comparative Culture specializing in nineteenth century Japanese and British medical history. I am currently working on cleanliness and water as a cultural history. The topics of my seminar in 2010 are ‘Cultural Interpretation and Representation of Diseases’ and ‘Representation of the Mother in Literature’.
    • Course
      This is a comparative history of tuberculosis with special reference to its romanticized images in Britain and Japan in the 19th and 20th centuries. The way diseases are considered has considerable cultural and historical significance. Medical books as well as literary works will be discussed in order to clarify the meaning of this infectious disease and its impact upon humankind.
    • Akitoshi NAGAHATA
    • Akitoshi NAGAHATA
      Professor
    • Profile
      I have MAs in English Studies (Tokyo University of Foreign Studies) and English (State University of New York at Albany). I have been teaching at Nagoya University since 1988. From 2011 to 2014, I served as the director of the Comparative Studies of Language and Culture program.
    • Field
      My area of study is American literature and culture, with a focus on poetry. I have published articles on Modernist and contemporary American poets (e.g., Pound, Stevens, Ashbery, Ginsberg), and post-war American novelists (Thomas Pynchon, John Barth) and artists (Bob Dylan, Woody Allen), among others.
    • Course
      In the G30 program, I am teaching "Literary Modernism and the Avant-garde," a course in which participants learn about some of the innovative writers in the Modernist tradition. In this course, participants will also learn how to analyze literary texts and study about various issues related to translation.
      • Takashi WAKUI
      • Takashi WAKUI
        Professor
      • Profile
        I received an MA.in comparative literature from Indiana University and a Ph.D. in East Asian languages and cultures from Columbia University in New York.
      • Field
        I wrote my Ph.D. dissertation on modern Japanese poetry. Since then, I have published papers in modern Japanese literature, particularly on its relationship with astronomy and stargazing. I have also translated Japanese poems into English. In the field of animation studies I have written a paper on Terada Torahiko and Oskar Fischinger. As a regular attendee at the Hiroshima animation festival since the mid 90s, I have witnessed the evolution of the art form in recent decades as well as gained knowledge about its varied forms around the world.
      • Course
        The course on world animation will focus on the three major traditions of animation, namely the U.S.A., Europe and Japan. We will discuss cultural backgrounds, techniques, relationships with other art forms, etc. Excellent works are being created today by independent animators armed with the latest 3D technology. But in order to evaluate them properly we need to look back and study history.
      • Sangmi KIM
      • Sangmi KIM
        Associate Professor
      • Profile
        I received Bachelor of Arts from Ewha Women’s University (Korea) and MA and Ph.D in Socio-Information from the University of Tokyo.
        [Homepage] http://sangmikim.jimdo.com/
      • Field
        Social and psychological impacts of media communication and information technologies (e.g. mobile devices, Internet, TV, etc), Information Behavior (IB), network communication, social and cultural impacts of digital technology, culture. I am also currently focusing on the digital divide and gender inequalities.
      • Course
        The course on “Online Communication” mainly focuses on the social and cultural implications of developments in ICT (Information Communication Technology). From the theoretical and empirical perspectives of online communication, we will explore the influence of the interactive web-based communication tools such as social networking services (SNS) on the political process and potential role in promoting social capital. In addition, we will discuss about the issue of negative social effect of the social media, for example, digital divide, knowledge gap, and gender inequality.
        • Chikako MATSUSHITA
        • Chikako MATSUSHITA
          Associate Professor
        • Profile
          I received my Ph.D in Literature from Nagoya University in 2007 on narratologies and queer readings of modern American novels. I am the author of Kuia Monogatariron (Queer Narratologies; Jimbunshoin, Japan, 2009) and the co-director of Allies (2009). I received the 16th Fukuhara Award for English literature in 2008.
        • Field
          Feminist theory, Sexuality studies, Literature and theory, Visual culture, Subculture
        • Course
          This course aims to offer critical insights into human sexuality expressed, viewed and constructed in Japanese subculture. Providing students with a critical overview of theory and research on gender and sexuality, especially from the first volume of Michel Foucault’s History of Sexuality, it will introduce how to analyze “critically” and “academically” the desires and the pleasures that faculty might obtain from various sexual images.
        • Masataka KAWAMURA
        • Masataka KAWAMURA
          Professor
        • Profile
          In 1975 I graduated from Faculty of Economics, The University of Tokyo.
          I worked for a long time as a program director and a producer of NHK(Japan Broadcasting Corporation), but my interest consisted in not only to make each TV program but also to realize media-mix, for example publication related to broadcasting contents, or international co-production. In London and New York I was engaged in the business to promote TV JAPAN (international Japanese TV service toward abroad), either.
        • Field
          Study of media and media history.
        • Course
          The dramatic development of broadcasting all over the world is one of the most significant matters in the history of the 20th century. But, if we examine the process of the development of the world’s broadcasting separately, we will come to notice that there are not a few differences among the various regions of the world. In this course, by tracing mainly the history of the US and Japan, I would like to analyze the feature of each society as well as the characteristics of each country’s broadcasting. In short, this class is about ‘Broadcasting seen through society and history’ and ‘Society and history seen through broadcasting’.
          • Akiko ITO
          • Akiko ITO
            Associate Professor
          • Profile
            I received a Ph.D. in Japanese Studies from the Graduate School of Advanced Studies. After completing my postdoctoral work at the International Research Center for Japanese Studies and the University of Minnesota, I taught at Morgan State University. Currently, I work as an International Student Advisor of GSLC while teaching classes in the G30 programs of Nagoya University.
          • Field
            My primary field of research is the comparative history of electrical technology. I am particularly interested in how the development of electrical technology has promoted modern life and generated new cultures and social structures. I have also studied how nationalistic discourses have been constructed related to the relative superiority of science and technology in postwar Japan.
          • Course
            My course will study the transformation of the cultural and social systems in modern Japan by examining the development and spread of electrical technologies.